Unique, authentic, thought-provoking


Step back in time and discover Scotland’s rural history at Auchindrain, the most complete and well-preserved example of a Scottish Highland farm township. Vividly imagine life in the old Highlands as you walk through the settlement and see how ordinary people lived and worked. Step into the restored longhouses, see the objects of everyday life and learn about the past inhabitants. Explore the byres, stables and fields to understand how groups of families worked the land in common. Uncover a fascinating, long-vanished Scottish way of life deep in the hills of Argyll.


Auchindrain is six miles south of Inveraray, just an hour and a half from Glasgow.

All contributions are very gratefully received and contribute to the valuable work we do here at Auchindrain.



Explore Auchindrain

Auchindrain is recognised as being the most complete surviving example of a Highland farm township, a type of settlement representative of much of Scottish rural history.



The name of the place is Achadh an Droighinn in Gaelic, and Auchindrain in the Scots language although until the 1950s the spelling was often Achindrain.  In the past, the name was sometimes translated into English as Thornfield.  Achadh is the Gaelic for “field”, and droighinn for the blackthorn or sloe tree – Prunus Spinosa.  The correct pronunciation is Achan-DRYan, with a soft “ch”. Say the “a” and the “i” in the Scots language spelling as two separate letters, and you won’t be far wrong


We are open from 1st April to 31st October, 10am to 5pm daily.


From November to March we are open most weekdays except over Christmas and New Year, but please telephone to check before you leave home.


In the winter the Visitor Centre is closed and you take us as you find us, but admission is free.


Adult: £6.50
Concession: £5.50
Under 18’s: £4.00
Local Residents and Friends of Auchindrain: £1.00
A 20% discount is available to up to two adults where a group includes more than one child, and to pre-booked groups of more than 20 people.


School and other educational visits must be booked and arranged in advance, so that we can provide the type and quality of service you have the right to expect.

Children under 5, carers supporting visitors with disabilities, guides and drivers, and members of the Museums Association, the Association of

Independent Museums and the Association of Scottish Visitor Attractions are admittted free.

Sorry, but we do not recognise membership cards for Historic Scotland or the National Trust for Scotland.


A reminder of a way of life now largely passed into history. It is easy is find horse-drawn Traveller wagons in museums and private collections, and in England there are companies who hire out modern versions for holidays. None of this, however, can convey a real sense of the joys and hardships encountered by Traveller families in the past. Lest we forget. ... See MoreSee Less

One of my favourite images. Speaks volumes x

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